News Updates


Don't forget hunter education course requirements before heading out this fall

Contact: Sgt. Tom Wanless, 517-335-3410 or Ed Golder, 517-335-3014 

Agency: Natural Resources

July 30, 2013

Michigan residents considering hunting in 2013 who need to complete a hunter education course should enroll in a class prior to Oct. 1, when offerings are plentiful. Classes are held year-round, but April, May, August and September are the traditional times when classes are most available. "With summer winding down and the focus turning to getting the kids ready for the school year, parents should consider that part of that 'back to school' routine should be enrolling in hunter education for any child 10 years old or older who wants to hunt this fall," said Sgt. Tom Wanless, hunter education program supervisor for the Department of Natural Resources. "Waiting until the last minute before you go deer hunting this fall can often translate into difficulty finding a class or an instructor available for a field day if you are planning to take the home-study or online course."

Michigan has three types of hunter education courses - a traditional classroom, a home-study and an online version. Anyone born on or after Jan. 1, 1960 is required to complete the course before buying a Michigan hunting license or taking an out-of-state hunting trip. Exceptions are made for youths under the age of 10 hunting under a mentored youth hunting license or hunters older than 10 hunting with an apprentice hunting license. Hunters can hunt under the apprentice program for two years before they are required to take hunter education.

The traditional classroom course is a minimum of 10 hours and includes both classroom and field work with an instructor. The home-study course features a workbook to complete classwork and requires a field/skills day. Michigan also offers two approved online hunter education courses, at www.hunter-ed.com/Michigan and www.huntercourse.com/usa/michigan. Students who opt for the online course complete their classwork online, and then have a field/skills day with an instructor and take a written exam.

Additionally, the DNR is seeking those interested in becoming hunter education instructors. There is a strong need for instructors in southeast Michigan. For more information on becoming an instructor in southeast Michigan, contact Specialist Peggy Ruby at rubyp@michigan.gov or call 586-405-5359.

For more information about hunter education or to find a class in your area, go to www.michigan.gov/huntereducation.

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is committed to the conservation, protection, management, use and enjoyment of the state's natural and cultural resources for current and future generations. For more information, go to www.michigan.gov/dnr.

 

Antlerless deer applications on sale now through Aug. 15

Contact: Lisa Jackson, 517-373-1263; Brent Rudolph, 517-641-4903; or Ed Golder, 517-335-3014 

Agency: Natural Resources

July 18, 2013

The Department of Natural Resources reminds hunters that the application period for antlerless deer licenses is now open through Aug. 15. Hunters can apply for a quota-limited license online at E-license, at any authorized license agent or at a DNR Customer Service Center. A nonrefundable $4 fee is charged at the time of application. Hunters may only apply for a single public-land or private-land license.

Beginning Sept. 5, applicants may visit www.michigan.gov/huntdrawings to check their drawing results and see the number of remaining licenses available.

Young hunters, ages 9-16, may purchase one junior antlerless deer license over the counter July 15 - Aug. 15. No application is required. A 9-year-old must be 10 by Sept. 15 to purchase this license.

About 554,000 antlerless deer licenses are available statewide for the 2013 deer seasons, down from about 709,000 for 2012. License quotas for individual Deer Management Units (DMUs) can be found at www.michigan.gov/deer.

Over-the-counter purchases will begin on Sept. 10 at 10 a.m. for licenses that are left over following the drawing and for private-land licenses in units for which applications are not accepted. Licenses will be sold until quotas are met. Applications are not accepted for private-land antlerless deer licenses for DMU 487 (including Alcona, Alpena, Iosco, Montmorency, Oscoda and Presque Isle counties in the northeast Lower Peninsula) and DMUs located in the southern Lower Peninsula.

A number of new, smaller DMUs have been created in southern Michigan, replacing the large multi-county DMU 486 that has been in place for the past few years. Several of these new DMUs range from two to four counties in size; DMU 308 (Barry, Calhoun, and Eaton counties), DMU 311 (Berrien, Cass, and Van Buren counties), DMU 319 (Clinton, Gratiot, Ingham and Shiawassee counties), DMU 332 (Huron, Sanilac, and Tuscola counties), DMU 339 (Kalamazoo and St. Joseph counties), DMU 341 (Kent and Ottawa counties and those portions of Muskegon County in Zone 3), DMU 354 (Mecosta and Montcalm counties), and DMU 361 (Newaygo and Oceana counties and those portions of Muskegon County in Zone 2). Watch the new southern Michigan DMU video to learn more.

Hunters also are reminded to apply for the Pure Michigan Hunt for $4 as many times as they would like. Three winners will receive a prize package valued at over $4,000 that includes an elk and bear license, rifle and crossbow. Visit www.michigan.gov/puremichiganhunt for more information. To purchase Pure Michigan Hunt applications, visit E-license.

For more information, see the 2013 Antlerless Deer Hunting Digest, which can be found at local license agents or online atwww.michigan.gov/dnrdigests.

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is committed to the conservation, protection, management, use and enjoyment of the state's natural and cultural resources for current and future generations. For more information, go to www.michigan.gov/dnr.

 

Demonstration Days at DNR shooting ranges give young hunters the chance to try firearms, archery equipment on for size

Contact: Mary Benson, 517-335-2748 or Ed Golder, 517-335-3014 

Agency: Natural Resources

July 17, 2013

The Department of Natural Resources offers Demonstration Days for mentored youth hunters at its Ortonville, Pontiac Lake, Rose Lake and Sharonville shooting ranges in August.

Mentored youth hunting regulations require that hunting devices are properly fitted and appropriately suited to the youth hunter. The Demonstration Days events will give young hunters a chance to try a variety of firearms - rifles, shotguns and muzzleloaders - archery equipment and crossbows with help from range officers and hunter education instructors; meet with conservation officers about what to expect while in the field; and try out the DNR's hunting simulator. Participating partners also include the National Wild Turkey Federation with its JAKES trailer and Pheasants Forever.

Mentored youth hunters and other young people interested in hunting are invited to stop by between 4 and 8 p.m. on the following days:

  • Aug. 6 at Pontiac Lake Shooting Range (Oakland County)
    located within the Pontiac Lake Recreation Area
    7800 Gale Road, Waterford
    (Recreation Passport required for entry)


  • Aug. 7 at Ortonville Shooting Range (Lapeer County)
    located within the Ortonville Recreation Area
    5380 Sawmill Lake Road, Ortonville
    (Recreation Passport required for entry)


  • Aug. 13 at Sharonville Shooting Range (Jackson County)
    located within the Sharonville State Game Area
    14520 Sharon Valley Road, Grass Lake


  • Aug. 14 at Rose Lake Shooting Range (Clinton County)
    located within the Rose Lake State Wildlife Area
    14500 Peacock Road, Bath

Participants will get a free hat and a bag full of helpful resources for new hunters. Firearms and ammunition will be provided, and attendees should not bring their own. Attendees should bring their own eye and ear protection. Registration is not required.

"If kids are using a firearm, bow or crossbow that's suited and fitted for them, then their first hunting experiences will be more successful and they'll be more likely to continue hunting," said Dennis Fox, DNR Recruitment and Retention manager. "Ensuring that young hunters have a safe and enjoyable time in the field is one way we can help pass Michigan's hunting tradition on to the next generation."

This project is supported by the National Shooting Sports Foundation's Range Partnership Grant Program.

The Mentored Youth Hunting program is designed to introduce youth under the age of 10 to hunting and fishing, offering a "package" license for just $7.50. For one low price, youth hunters under the age of 10 can hunt turkey (spring and fall, any hunt period/location, on private or public land), deer (two tags, any deer) and small game, trap furbearers and fish for all species. By eliminating the minimum hunting age in Michigan, the program is geared toward parents and other adult mentors who want to teach children how to hunt and fish, allowing them to determine if and when their child is ready to hunt. To learn more about the Mentored Youth Hunting program, visit www.michigan.gov/mentoredhunting.

More information about the DNR's shooting ranges is available at www.michigan.gov/shootingranges.

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is committed to the conservation, protection, management, use and enjoyment of the state's natural and cultural resources for current and future generations. For more information, go to www.michigan.gov/dnr.

 

NRC approves antlerless deer license quotas

Contact: Brent Rudolph, 517-641-4903 ext. 248 or Ed Golder, 517-335-3014 

Agency: Natural Resources

July 15, 2013

The Department of Natural Resources will make approximately the same number of public-land antlerless deer licenses available to hunters this fall as last, after the Natural Resources Commission approved antlerless license quotas at its meeting last week in Lansing.

Private-land licenses, however, will decrease by about 25 percent, most significantly in southern Michigan.

The DNR will make 70,550 licenses available for public land, down slightly from last year's 70,750. A total of 483,400 private-land licenses will be available, down from 637,900 in the 2012 season.

In the northern Lower Peninsula, more antlerless licenses will be available for both public and private land. The DNR will make 35,900 public-land licenses available, up from 30,900 last year, and 119,100 private-land licenses, up from 115,500.

"Recent deer population trends in the northern Lower Peninsula have been increasing due to three previous mild winters," Rudolph said. "Although this winter had a number of severe storms, the overall impact appears to be mild with the majority of deer observed by staff appearing to be healthy and fit."

In the Upper Peninsula, 18,800 private-land licenses, down from 21,250 last year, will be available. The quota for public-land licenses has been cut from 5,900 to 4,500.

"An overall decrease in antlerless licenses was recommended in many deer management units (DMUs) in anticipation of increased adult deer mortality and low fawn recruitment due to the prolonged winter," said DNR deer and elk program leader Brent Rudolph.

In the southern Lower Peninsula, quotas for both public land and private land have been reduced. The DNR will make 30,150 licenses available for public land, down from 33,950 last year, and 345,500 private-land licenses, down from 519,650 in 2012.

"Deer populations in many areas are now near goals," Rudolph said. "This is particularly the case in some areas that have experienced repeated outbreaks of epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD) over the last several years."

Hunters are reminded that many DMUs have changed as a result of changes to local deer populations. Check the 2013 Antlerless Deer Hunting Digest for details.

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is committed to the conservation, protection, management, use and enjoyment of the state's natural and cultural resources for current and future generations. For more information, go to www.michigan.gov/dnr.

 

NRC authorizes regulation, eligibility changes to assist hunters with disabilities

Contact: Lt. Creig Grey, 517-241-1550 or Ed Golder, 517-335-3014 

Agency: Natural Resources

July 12, 2013

The Natural Resources Commission (NRC) has renamed two special deer hunts for hunters with disabilities and modified the rules for eligibility and the use of ground blinds. These actions were taken at the NRC's regular monthly meeting yesterday in Lansing.

The Youth and 100 Percent Disabled Veteran Firearm Deer Hunting Days, scheduled for Sept. 21-22, has been renamed the Liberty Hunt. The Special Firearm Disabled Hunter Deer Hunting Days, scheduled for Oct. 17-20, is now called the Independence Hunt.

Participants in the Liberty Hunt were previously limited to veterans with 100-percent disability and youth younger than 17 years of age. The NRC has expanded the eligibility to include hunters who are legally blind or have been issued a permit to use a laser-sighting device or to hunt from a standing vehicle. The Department of Natural Resources estimates that fewer than 1,000 hunters have been issued these permits.

The NRC also simplified the application process for permits to hunt from a standing vehicle. Previously, a conservation officer met with the applicant to determine eligibility. Now, the DNR will accept forms that have been completed by a licensed physician, physical therapist or occupational therapist. Permits will have no expiration date.

Hunters participating in the Liberty Hunt with a firearm or combination license have been allowed to take a deer of either sex, while those in the Independence Hunt were limited to antlered bucks only. The NRC amended the rules so the either-sex provision applies to the Independence Hunt as well. Antler point restrictions for bucks continue to apply to both hunts, except youth participating in the Mentored Youth Hunting program.

Hunters with disabilities are allowed to place ground blinds 10 days previous to the season they are to hunt. In the past, hunters must have possessed a standing vehicle permit or a disabled-parking permit issued by the Secretary of State, or have met the disability standards in the Michigan Off-Road Vehicle Law, to place the blind. The NRC expanded eligibility to include hunters who have crossbow disability permits.

Additionally, the NRC waived the requirement that ground blinds be removed daily, as was previously required prior to Nov. 6. Hunters with appropriate permits will now be allowed to leave the blinds up overnight until the season has concluded.

The changes are designed to allow hunters with disabilities to have a better chance of successfully harvesting a deer.

For more information about hunting seasons and opportunities throughout the state, visit the DNR website at www.michigan.gov/hunting.

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is committed to the conservation, protection, management, use and enjoyment of the state's natural and cultural resources for current and future generations. For more information, go to www.michigan.gov/dnr.

 

U.P. Deer Advisory Team meeting rescheduled for July 13

Contact: Ashley Autenrieth, 989-732-3541 or Sarah Lapshan, 517-335-3014

Agency: Natural Resources

July 3, 2013

The Upper Peninsula Deer Advisory Team (UPDAT) will be meeting for the fifth time on Saturday, July 13 in Munising.

"We will be sharing the results of the 2012 Hunter Harvest Survey and discussing the current regulations season that is under way, in addition to finalizing the UPDAT's buck management recommendation," said Deer Program biologist Ashley Autenrieth.

Deer advisory teams were established to provide direct input to the DNR's Wildlife Division based on the three regions of the state (Upper Peninsula, Northern Lower Peninsula and Southern Lower Peninsula). Each region has a deer advisory team made up of members with a direct connection to issues in the region, either as private individuals affected by deer hunting and management or representatives of organizations with members or constituents in the region. Team members help to communicate with the public and key partners and organizations.

On July 13 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. (Eastern Standard Time) at the Holiday Inn Express in Munising (E8890 M-28), the UPDAT will meet to discuss the following topics:

  • Buck management in the Upper Peninsula
  • 2012 hunter harvest survey
  • License restructuring package

The public is always encouraged to attend these biannual meetings as observers; however, the discussions during the meetings are for the UPDAT members. If time permits, questions or comments from the public will be taken at the end.

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is committed to the conservation, protection, management, use and enjoyment of the state's natural and cultural resources for current and future generations. For more information, go to www.michigan.gov/dnr.

 

Local organization hosts meetings on antler point restrictions - proposed for 2014 season

Contact: Brent Rudolph, 517-641-4903; Ashley Autenrieth, 989-732-3541; or Sarah Lapshan, 517-335-3014

Agency: Natural Resources

July 3, 2013

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources (DNR) advises the public that an organization known as the Lower Peninsula Deer Management Initiative (LPDMI) will hold informational meetings regarding deer antler point restriction (APR) proposals at a number of locations this July. Individuals are invited to attend a local event to learn more about the APR process and the specific proposals currently under consideration.

The DNR supports the voluntary implementation of APR on private land. Under guidelines adopted by the Natural Resources Commission (NRC), mandatory regulations proposed by sponsoring organizations will only be recommended for implementation if DNR staff has no biological concerns regarding such regulations, and if a clear majority (at least 66 percent) of support among hunters in the proposed area is documented. Support will be determined by a DNR survey mailed to a sample of hunters who indicated on the 2012 DNR deer harvest survey that they hunted deer in the proposal area.

LPDMI has submitted two different APR proposals to be considered for implementation starting with the 2014 deer season. Antlerless deer regulations within the proposed areas would continue to be determined annually by the DNR. Surveys to measure support for these proposals will be mailed starting in August or September. Payment by the LPDMI will offset survey costs incurred by this proposal.

The process for review of APR proposals provides a uniform approach for addressing requests by organizations for adopting such regulations. The NRC retains full authority over decisions to implement APR and other harvest regulations regardless of the survey outcome, but the proposal review process provides valuable information to inform those decisions.

The first proposal of the LPDMI calls for implementing a minimum three-point APR for a portion of the northern Lower Peninsula. This proposal area includes Cheboygan, Otsego, Crawford, Roscommon, Ogemaw, Clare, Gladwin and Oceana counties and those portions of Muskegon, Newaygo, Mecosta, Isabella, Midland, Bay and Arenac counties within Hunting and Trapping Zone 2. The APR would not apply to individuals hunting with an apprentice hunting license or mentored youth hunting license or youth hunters during a designated youth season. For all other hunters, antlered deer would be required to have at least three antler points on one side. Throughout Michigan, all hunters that harvest two antlered deer must ensure at least one has four or more antler points on one side, and this proposal would not change that requirement.

The second proposal of the LPDMI calls for implementing a four-point APR for all of Hunting and Trapping Zone 3 in southern Michigan. Zone 3 includes portions of Muskegon, Newaygo, Mecosta, Isabella, Midland, Bay and Arenac counties and all other counties to the south. The APR would not apply to individuals hunting with an apprentice hunting license or mentored youth hunting license or youth hunters during a designated youth season. This proposal seeks to require that all other antlered deer harvested in the area have at least four antler points on one side.

The public meetings listed below will be hosted by the LPDMI to explain their interest in APR implementation and answer questions about their proposals. For all meetings, doors will open at 6:30 p.m., the meeting will run from 7 to 8 p.m., and the building must be cleared by 8:30 p.m. Nine previously announced meetings were held in June in a variety of locations throughout the APR proposal areas.

  • July 9: Gaylord High School gymnasium, 90 Livingston Blvd., Gaylord, 49735

  • July 11: Shelby High School auditorium, 641 N. State St., Shelby, 49455

  • July 16: Hudsonville High School gymnasium, 5037 32nd Ave., Hudsonville, 49426

  • July 18: Ogemaw Heights High School auditorium, 960 S. M-33, West Branch, 48661

  • July 23: Central Montcalm Middle School cafeteria, 1480 S. Sheridan Rd. SW, Stanton, 48888

Landowners in the proposal areas who would like to offer their input about the proposals may email their comments to DNR-wildlife@michigan.gov.

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is committed to the conservation, protection, management, use and enjoyment of the state's natural and cultural resources for current and future generations. For more information, go to www.michigan.gov/dnr.

 

Local organization to host meetings on proposed deer antler point restrictions in Michigan's Lower Peninsula

Contact: Brent Rudolph, 517-641-4903; Ashley Autenrieth 989-732-3541; or Sarah Lapshan, 517-241-1736

Agency: Natural Resources

June 7, 2013

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources (DNR) today advised the public that an organization will hold informational meetings regarding deer antler point restriction (APR) proposals at a number of locations in June 2013. Individuals are invited to attend a local event to learn more about the APR process and the specific proposals currently under consideration.

The DNR supports the voluntary implementation of APR on private land. Under guidelines adopted by the Natural Resources Commission (NRC), mandatory regulations proposed by sponsoring organizations will only be recommended for implementation if DNR staff has no biological concerns regarding such regulations, and if a clear majority (at least 66 percent) of support among hunters in the proposed area is documented. Support will be determined by a DNR survey mailed to a sample of hunters who indicated on the 2012 DNR deer harvest survey that they hunted deer in the proposal area.

A group known as the Lower Peninsula Deer Management Initiative (LPDMI) has submitted two different APR proposals to be considered for implementation starting with the 2014 deer season. Antlerless deer regulations within the proposed areas would continue to be determined annually by the DNR. Surveys to measure support for these proposals will be mailed starting in August. Payment by the LPDMI will offset survey costs incurred by this proposal.

The process for review of APR proposals provides a uniform approach for addressing requests by organizations for adopting such regulations. The NRC retains full authority over decisions to implement APR and other harvest regulations regardless of the survey outcome, but the proposal review process provides valuable information to inform those decisions.

The first proposal of the LPDMI calls for implementing a minimum three-point APR for a portion of the northern Lower Peninsula. This proposal area includes Cheboygan, Otsego, Crawford, Roscommon, Ogemaw, Clare, Gladwin and Oceana counties and those portions of Muskegon, Newaygo, Mecosta, Isabella, Midland, Bay and Arenac counties within Hunting and Trapping Zone 2. The APR would not apply to individuals hunting with an apprentice hunting license or mentored youth hunting license or youth hunters during a designated youth season. For all other hunters, antlered deer would be required to have at least three antler points on one side. Throughout Michigan, all hunters that harvest two antlered deer must ensure at least one has four or more antler points on one side, and this proposal would not change that requirement.

The second proposal of the LPDMI calls for implementing a four-point APR for all of Hunting and Trapping Zone 3 in southern Michigan. Zone 3 includes portions of Muskegon, Newaygo, Mecosta, Isabella, Midland, Bay, and Arenac counties and all other counties to the south. The APR would not apply to individuals hunting with an apprentice hunting license or mentored youth hunting license or youth hunters during a designated youth season. This proposal seeks to require that all other antlered deer harvested in the area have at least four antler points on one side.

The public meetings listed below will be hosted by the LPDMI to explain its interest in APR implementation and answer questions about the proposals. The meeting in Clare will primarily address the proposed three-point APR for Zone 2. All other meetings will primarily address the proposed four-point APR for Zone 3. For all meetings, doors will open at 6:30 pm, the meeting will run from 7 to 8 p.m., and the building must be cleared by 8:30 p.m. Five additional meetings to be held in July will be announced at a later date.

  • June 11: Newaygo High School cafeteria, 200 East St., Newaygo, MI 49337

  • June 12: Phoenix Lodge No. 13. F&AM, 5752 Whittaker Road, Ypsilanti, MI 48197

  • June 13: Decatur Middle School cafeteria, 405 N. Phelps St., Decatur, MI 49045

  • June 18: Jonesville High School gymnasium, 460 Adrian St., Jonesville, MI 49250

  • June 19: Imlay City High School auditorium, 1001 Norlin Drive, Imlay City, MI 48444

  • June 20: Cass City High School gymnasium, 4868 North Seeger St., Cass City, MI 48726

  • June 25: Chesaning High School gymnasium, 850 N. 4th St., Chesaning, MI 48616

  • June 27: Clare Middle School auditorium, 209 E. State St., Clare, MI 48617

Landowners in one of the proposed areas who would like to offer input about the proposal may email their comments to DNR-wildlife@michigan.gov.

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is committed to the conservation, protection, management, use and enjoyment of the state's natural and cultural resources for current and future generations. For more information, go to www.michigan.gov/dnr.

 

Local organization to host meeting on proposed southern Michigan deer antler point restrictions June 4 in East Lansing

Contact: Brent Rudolph, 517-641-4903 or Sarah Lapshan, 517-241-1736

Agency: Natural Resources

May 31, 2013

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources (DNR) today advised the public that a local organization will hold an informational meeting regarding a proposed deer antler point restriction (APR) on June 4 at the East Lansing High School.

A group known as the Lower Peninsula Deer Management Initiative (LPDMI) has proposed a four-point APR for all of Zone 3 in southern Michigan. Zone 3 includes portions of Muskegon, Newaygo, Mecosta, Isabella, Midland, Bay and Arenac County and all other counties to the south. This proposal seeks to require that all antlered deer harvested in the area have at least four antler points on one side. The restriction will be considered for implementation starting with the 2014 deer season. Antlerless deer regulations within the proposed area would continue to be determined annually by the DNR.

The upcoming meeting will be held at the East Lansing High School Student Union (cafeteria), at 509 Burcham Drive in East Lansing. Doors will open at 6:30 p.m., the meeting will run from 7-8 p.m., and the building must be cleared by 8:30 p.m. Additional meetings will be announced as they are scheduled. The LPDMI will be hosting a total of 10 meetings in the Zone 3 proposal area to explain its interest in APR implementation and answer questions about the proposal.

Landowners in the proposed area who would like to offer input about the proposal may email their comments to DNR-wildlife@michigan.gov.

The DNR supports the voluntary implementation of APR on private land. Under guidelines adopted by the Natural Resources Commission (NRC), mandatory regulations proposed by sponsoring organizations will only be recommended for implementation if DNR staff has no biological concerns regarding such regulations, and if a clear majority (at least 66 percent) of support among hunters in the proposed area is documented. Support will be determined by a DNR survey mailed to a sample of hunters who indicated on the 2012 DNR deer harvest survey that they hunted deer in the proposal area. Surveys will be mailed starting in August. Payment by the LPDMI will offset survey costs incurred by this proposal.

This process for review of APR proposals provides a uniform approach for addressing requests by individual hunters and organizations for adopting such regulations. The NRC retains full authority over decisions to implement APR and other harvest regulations regardless of the survey outcome, but the proposal review process provides valuable information to inform those decisions.

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is committed to the conservation, protection, management, use and enjoyment of the state's natural and cultural resources for current and future generations. For more information, go to www.michigan.gov/dnr.

 

U.P. conservation organizations awarded DNR deer habitat improvement grants

Contact: Bill Scullon, 906-563-9247 or Sarah Lapshan, 517-241-1736

Agency: Natural Resources

May 20, 2013

Six Upper Peninsula conservation organizations will receive Deer Habitat Improvement Partnership Initiative (DHIPI) grants from the Department of Natural Resources' Wildlife Division in 2013, DNR officials announced today.

The projects, totaling $50,000 of DHIPI grant money, will improve deer habitat in Alger, Dickinson, Iron, Mackinac, Menominee and Ontonagon counties.

The DHIPI grant program is designed to attract and support proposals from non-government organizations interested in improving white-tailed deer habitat in the Upper Peninsula. The competitive grant program, funded by the state's Deer Range Improvement Fund (DRIP), requires the projects be located on non-state-owned land, including private property and Commercial Forest Act-enrolled land.

The following organizations will receive 2013 DHIPI grants:

  • The Dickinson Conservation District will receive $7,700 to plant crab apple and oak trees on 40 parcels of privately owned land in Dickinson, Iron and Menominee counties to improve hard and soft mast availability.

  • U.P. Whitetails, in partnership with The Forestland Group LLC., will receive $9,500 to plant conifers and advanced oak saplings on Heartwood Forestland Fund IV property where hard mast-producing beech trees have been lost due to beech bark disease. Approximately 400 acres in Alger County will receive 8-foot-tall saplings in a concerted effort to establish acorn-producing oak groves and enhance historic winter deer range.

  • Wildlife Unlimited of Iron County will receive $7,500 to partner with the Natural Resources Conservation Service to enhance wildlife openings on 10 sites with native prairie and cool-season plantings. This project partners deer habitat improvement with Wildlife Unlimited's youth hunter recruitment program. It also provides new opportunities for disabled hunters using the group's specially outfitted accessibility hunting trailer.

  • The Ontonagon chapter of Whitetails Unlimited will receive $7,850 to create a 10-acre wildlife opening project adjacent to a deer wintering complex. This project is intended to provide nutritious wildlife forage to deer during the snow-free months, especially the critical weeks in the spring and fall as deer migrate to and from winter habitat.

  • Straits Area Sportsmen's Club will receive $9,200 to plant 20 large red oak trees (each at least 15 feet tall) on U.S. Forest Service land in Mackinac County. These unique plantings are designed to introduce acorn-bearing trees onto the landscape where hard mast is deficient, and the advanced size of the trees means they can produce acorns within a few years and are above the deer browse line.

  • The Alger and Schoolcraft County chapters of U.P. Whitetails and the Alger County Fish and Game Alliance will receive $8,250 in partnership to enhance a 50-acre wildlife opening on private land. This area is immediately adjacent to the Petrel deer wintering complex and will benefit deer in the spring and fall as they move to winter habitat.

"All of these projects are prime examples of how communities of sportsmen can partner with the DNR to enhance deer habitat in their local area," said DNR wildlife biologist Bill Scullon, who oversees the DHIPI program. "Not only are there the direct habitat benefits of the projects, but the partnerships that develop can provide the basis for many more community-based conservation efforts."

"Habitat improvement projects like these give us the ability to test novel mechanisms, evaluate what works, and incorporate those successful efforts into the future planning for the broader landscape," according to Natural Resources Commissioner John Madigan of Munising.

The six grant recipients were also congratulated by Natural Resources Commission Chairman J.R. Richardson of Ontonagon. "These habitat improvement projects bring real value back to the resource, and I have to thank the sporting groups and community partners for their dedication and involvement," Richardson said.

For more information about the Deer Habitat Improvement Partnership Initiative or the DRIP Fund, contact Bill Scullon at 906-563-9247. More information about deer management in Michigan can be found online at www.michigan.gov/deer.

Created by legislation in 1971, the DRIP fund is supported by a $1.50 allocation from each deer license sold (except for senior licenses), which equals $2.2 to $2.8 million in funding annually. This restricted funding is for the enhancement, maintenance, and acquisition of deer habitat statewide.

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is committed to the conservation, protection, management, use and enjoyment of the state's natural and cultural resources for current and future generations. For more information, go to www.michigan.gov/dnr.

 

Heavy late-winter snow will challenge Upper Peninsula deer population

Contact: Terry Minzey, 906-228-6561 or Ed Golder, 517-335-3014

Agency: Natural Resources

April 22, 2013

Although early winter snow in Michigan's Upper Peninsula was mild compared to the past few years, precipitation late in the season resulted in above-average snow depths that are continuing well into spring. These conditions are challenging deer in the region, and are expected to lead to lower survival and fawn recruitment rates than seen during the last few years.

Winter conditions are a significant factor for the U.P.'s deer herd. Mild winters, such as those experienced from 2010-2012, provide favorable conditions for over-winter survival and allow pregnant does to produce healthy fawns. Harsher winters with deep snows restrict movement and challenge energy reserves. Those conditions affect survival rates, particularly for deer living in harsher conditions, and put additional stress on pregnant does.

Due to the importance of winter conditions for Michigan's deer population, weekly snow depth measurements are taken at various U.P. stations throughout the winter. This year, snow depths through January were below average, suggesting that winter may be mild once again. However, heavy precipitation in February and March left deep snows across the peninsula. Those conditions have extended well into April.

Biologists anticipate negative impacts to the deer herd when winter conditions persist longer than three months. Because of the heavy late-winter snowfall, U.P. deer are showing visible signs of winter fatigue, including thin body conditions and lethargic behavior. Biologists have already received reports of deer mortalities. Additional reports are anticipated in the coming weeks.

Population indices indicate that the deer population across the region experienced a low in 2009 following two consecutive harsh winters. The population has since been increasing. Although it is too early to determine the full impact of this year's winter, biologists expect population growth will at least slow this year given the conditions.

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is committed to the conservation, protection, management, use and enjoyment of the state's natural and cultural resources for current and future generations. For more information, go to www.michigan.gov/dnr.

 

Growing number of Michigan deer hunters give crossbows a try

Contact: Brent Rudolph, 517-641-4903; Brian Frawley, 517-241-4169; or Ed Golder, 517-335-3014

Agency: Natural Resources

Feb. 19, 2013

Although the overall number of hunters in Michigan has been on a slight decline, the Department of Natural Resources reports that a recent deer hunter survey shows growth in one method of deer hunting - crossbows.

Crossbow hunter afield in tree standIn the past, only hunters with disabilities had the option to hunt with a crossbow. Beginning in 2009, crossbows were allowed in most areas of Michigan during the archery deer season in an attempt to expand hunting opportunities, retain existing hunters and recruit new hunters. Crossbow hunters were required to obtain a free crossbow stamp to determine the number of hunters who took advantage of the new method.

In 2009, the opportunity to use a crossbow was extended only to hunters 50 years of age or older in the Upper Peninsula and northern Lower Peninsula, while hunters of any age could use crossbows in the southern Lower Peninsula. In 2010 the age restriction was eliminated statewide.

The archery deer season runs statewide on public and private land and is divided into early and late season segments (Oct. 1 through Nov. 14 and Dec. 1 through Jan. 1). In the Upper Peninsula, crossbows are only allowed to be used in the early archery season.

"We have discovered that in 2011, 25 percent of the crossbow users had not hunted in the archery season in previous years," said DNR Deer and Elk Program Leader Brent Rudolph. "These hunters were newly recruited or drawn back to the sport of archery hunting."

The opinion survey also revealed that hunting with a crossbow met most or all of the archers' expectations, and nearly all crossbow hunters planned to use crossbows again in the future.

The number of hunters who obtained the free crossbow stamp by year is:

2009 - 45,692
2010 - 64,340
2011 - 74,120
2012 - 88,565

Although the expanded opportunity increased the number of archery hunters, the amount of deer harvested overall during the archery season did not increase each year. Harvest of deer over all seasons combined declined or was similar to previous years.

"With close to 800,000 hunters in Michigan annually, we know deer hunting is a strong tradition held by many," said DNR Wildlife Division Chief Russ Mason. "The expanded crossbow regulations met all the expectations we hoped for. Our primary goal is to do a good job managing the deer herd, and if new hunting opportunities can also be made, that's a good thing."

To view the entire Crossbow Deer Hunter Survey report, go to www.michigan.gov/hunting and click on Wildlife Surveys and Reports in the left-hand navigation bar.

Hunters are reminded to fill out their 2012 deer harvest survey by going online to https://secure1.state.mi.us/deersurvey.

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is committed to the conservation, protection, management, use and enjoyment of the state's natural and cultural resources for current and future generations. For more information, go to www.michigan.gov/dnr.

 

DNR now taking applications for deer habitat improvement grants

Contact: Bill Scullon, 906-563-9247 or Debbie Munson Badini, 906-226-1352

Agency: Natural Resources

Feb. 14, 2013

Sportsmen's clubs and other non-government organizations interested in deer habitat improvement on private land in the Upper Peninsula are encouraged to apply for Deer Habitat Improvement Partnership Initiative grants now through Sunday, March 31, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources announced today.

A total of $50,000 will be available in 2013 through the competitive DHIPI grant process. Project proposals from organizations with a formal mission to promote wildlife conservation and/or hunting seeking between $2,000 and $10,000 in funding are eligible for consideration.

Now in its fifth year, the DHIPI grant program is designed to attract and support proposals from non-government organizations interested in improving deer habitat on non-state-owned land in the Upper Peninsula, including private property and Commercial Forest Act-enrolled land. (Projects that provide foot access to the public are more likely to be successful.)

"There are three primary goals applicants should strive to meet," said DNR private lands wildlife biologist Bill Scullon. "The projects should produce tangible deer habitat improvements, build long-term partnerships with the DNR, and identify ways to showcase the benefits to the public."

Scullon said he encourages representatives of interested organizations to contact their local DNR wildlife biologist for help in developing competitive project proposals.

In 2012, six projects were funded in 11 Upper Peninsula counties, improving deer habitat on a total of 691 acres of private industrial forest and federal land.

The projects completed in 2012 ranged from planting red oak seedlings in Mackinac County to creating or improving wildlife openings in Delta, Menominee and Ontonagon counties. In addition to improving deer habitat, successful projects in Delta and Iron counties also provided improved access for youth and disabled hunters.

The DHIPI grant application packet can be accessed online by visiting www.michigan.gov/dnr-grants and clicking on the "Deer Habitat Improvement Partnership Initiative" link. Application deadline is Sunday, March 31; successful applicants will be notified by Monday, April 15. For more information, contact Bill Scullon at 906-563-9247 or scullonh@michigan.gov.

DHIPI grants are funded by the state's Deer Range Improvement Program (DRIP). Created by legislation in 1971, the DRIP fund is supported by a $1.50 allocation from each deer license sold (except for senior licenses), which equals $2.2 to $2.8 million in funding annually. This restricted funding is for the enhancement, maintenance, and acquisition of deer habitat statewide. The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is committed to the conservation, protection, management, use and enjoyment of the state's natural and cultural resources for current and future generations. For more information, go to www.michigan.gov/dnr.

 

Northern Lower Deer Advisory Team to meet for third time Feb. 16 in Cadillac

Contact: Ashley Autenrieth, 989-732-3541 or Ed Golder, 517-335-3014

Agency: Natural Resources

Feb. 6, 2013

The Department of Natural Resources' Northern Lower Deer Advisory Team (NLDAT) will meet on Saturday, Feb. 16, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at McGuire's Resort in Cadillac (7880 Mackinaw Trail).

With the approval of the Michigan Deer Management Plan in 2010, the Department of Natural Resources committed to establishing Regional Deer Advisory Teams (DAT) for each area of the state. Each DAT corresponds to the boundaries of the DNR hunting and trapping zones - Zone 1 being the Upper Peninsula, Zone 2 the northern Lower Peninsula, and Zone 3 the southern Lower Peninsula.

The NLDAT serves as an advisory team to the DNR Wildlife Division on deer management in the northern Lower Peninsula. The goal of the team is to serve as a conduit between the public and the DNR to better understand the major concerns surrounding white-tailed deer.

The Feb. 16 meeting will focus on:

the 2012 deer season
the antler point restriction proposal process

"Understanding what is most important to the public is a major part of wildlife management, and this group offers an excellent way for us to gain that," said DNR deer program biologist Ashley Autenrieth. "We hope to accomplish a lot with the NLDAT in the future."

The NLDAT is made up entirely of volunteers who have been appointed by the Natural Resources Commission and the DNR, for either two or three years. Team members will attend local open houses, which will be public meetings for sharing information and gathering public input in their region.

"The Deer Advisory Teams are a critical connection between the public and the DNR," said Russ Mason, DNR Wildlife Division chief. "Understanding the public's views on deer management is the only way we can have successful deer management in Michigan."

Members of the public are welcome to attend as observers, although the meeting is not open for public comment. If time permits, the NLDAT will take questions and comments from the public.

Anyone who would like to suggest topics for NLDAT discussion is asked to email Ashley Autenrieth at autenrietha@michigan.gov or to share comments at http://deer.fw.msu.edu/involved/nlteam.php.

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is committed to the conservation, protection, management, use and enjoyment of the state's natural and cultural resources for current and future generations. For more information, go to www.michigan.gov/dnr.

 

U.P. Deer Advisory Team to meet January 19 in Iron Mountain

Contact: Ashley Autenrieth 989-732-3541 or Debbie Munson Badini, 906-226-1352
Agency: Natural Resources

Jan. 15, 2013

The Department of Natural Resources' Upper Peninsula Deer Advisory Team (UPDAT) will meet on Saturday, Jan. 19 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Central Time at the Country Inn and Suites in Iron Mountain, located at 2005 S. Stephenson Ave.

Topics up for discussion at the UPDAT meeting include:
Buck management in the Upper Peninsula
The 2012 deer season
Multiple-year regulations

"This is a great time of year to have the UPDAT members gather around the table to talk about their impressions of the 2012 deer season and share perspectives with one another," said DNR deer program biologist Ashley Autenrieth.

Deer advisory teams were established to provide direct input to the DNR's Wildlife Division based on the three regions of the state (Upper Peninsula, Northern Lower Peninsula and Southern Lower Peninsula). Each region has a deer advisory team made up of members with a direct connection to issues in the region, either as private individuals affected by deer hunting and management or representatives of organizations with members or constituents in the region. Team members help to communicate with the public and key partners and organizations.

Interested members of the public are encouraged to attend these biannual meetings as observers. Although discussions during the meeting are for the UPDAT members, if time permits, questions or comments from the public will be taken at the end of the meeting.

To learn more about the deer advisory teams, visit www.michigan.gov/deer.

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is committed to the conservation, protection, management, use and enjoyment of the state's natural and cultural resources for current and future generations. For more information, go to www.michigan.gov/dnr.

 

2012 Michigan deer hunting on the rise this firearm season

Contact: Brent Rudolph, 517-641-4903; Ashley Hippler, 989-732-3541; or Ed Golder, 517-335-3014
Agency: Natural Resources

Nov. 20, 2012

The 2012 firearm deer season opened Thursday, Nov. 15, and the Department of Natural Resources has compiled early impressions from the first few days.

As the season opened, deer license sales were about 2 percent higher than at the same time in 2011. A total of nearly 640,000 hunters had purchased one or more Michigan deer licenses. The firearm season remains open through Friday, Nov. 30.

Weather conditions around the state have been good for hunting. Tracking snow is lacking in most areas, and little precipitation of any type has occurred over the first several days of the season. Mornings have offered cool temperatures and the best hunting conditions, and winds have been mostly light. Midday temperatures have been warm for this time of year, which can reduce midday deer activity but has provided comfortable conditions for hunters to remain afield. The weekend saw lower daily high temperatures than the first two days, but morning fog rolled into many areas of the Lower Peninsula. In many locations, though, deer have been on the move, providing enjoyable hunting. Condition of deer harvested throughout the state has been reported as good to excellent.

The following are the early impressions summarized on a regional basis:

Upper Peninsula
In the Upper Peninsula, most hunters have been observing more deer this year. Buck numbers are up, and fawn production appears to have been good this spring and summer. The number of deer checked has been similar to last year in the eastern U.P., while some areas of the central U.P. are seeing their highest numbers of deer checked in several years.

Northern Lower Peninsula
The increase in license sales may be resulting in an increase in hunter numbers in northern regions of the state, particularly on public land in the northern Lower Peninsula. In the eastern and southern portions of this region in particular, hunter numbers appeared higher than they were last year. The number of deer checked compared to last year has varied, though in some cases lower numbers may be due to cool temperatures allowing hunters to hang deer for several days. Hunters have seen a good number of deer, and bucks appear to be in excellent condition.

Southern Lower Peninsula
Deer have often been on the move during the early days of the firearm season in the southern Lower Peninsula, except during warm midday periods. Hunter numbers appear to be similar to recent years, though they have been lower around some areas that have been most heavily affected by outbreaks of epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD) this summer. However, many hunters have remained upbeat, and have indicated in some of these locations they are pleasantly surprised at the number of deer that they are still seeing. Hunter observations regarding impacts of EHD are being collected at check stations to increase information available to the department to evaluate the extent of the outbreak.

To learn more about Michigan deer hunting seasons, visit www.michigan.gov/deer.

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is committed to the conservation, protection, management, use and enjoyment of the state's natural and cultural resources for current and future generations. For more information, go to www.michigan.gov/dnr.

 

Michigan DNR hosts 'DNR Live: Deer' online video forum, 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 13

Nov. 8, 2012

Deer hunters and others interested in deer management in Michigan are invited to join the Department of Natural Resources at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 13, for "DNR Live: Deer" -- a one-hour online forum designed to answer questions from the public about the state's deer population, hunting seasons and regulations.

The video event will stream live on the DNR's Facebook page at www.facebook.com/miDNR. A Facebook account is not required to access the page and watch the livestream event.

The online forum's panel of DNR experts will include the Wildlife Division's deer and elk program leader Brent Rudolph and wildlife veterinarian Steve Schmitt, along with Law Enforcement Division Assistant Chief Dean Molnar.

The public is invited to post questions in advance on the DNR's Facebook page, send via Twitter to @MichiganDNR using the hashtag #DNRlive, or email to dnr-facebook@michigan.gov, no later than 5 p.m. Monday, Nov. 12.

"We are excited to use this interactive technology to share information with the public on the cusp of Michigan's firearm deer season opener," said DNR Director Keith Creagh. "Our panel of experts is looking forward to answering a broad range of questions about deer management and hunting. We expect to address deer season prospects and the health of the state's deer herd, including this year's outbreak of epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD)."

For more information about how to participate in the "DNR Live: Deer" online forum, email dnr-facebook@michigan.gov or contact DNR Public Information Officer Ed Golder at goldere@michigan.gov. To learn more about deer management and hunting in Michigan, visit www.michigan.gov/deer.

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is committed to the conservation, protection, management, use and enjoyment of the state's natural and cultural resources for current and future generations. For more information, go to www.michigan.gov/dnr.

 

DNR asks for continued assistance in reporting deer die-offs from EHD

Contact: Brent Rudolph, 517-641-4903; Tom Cooley, 517-336-5030; or Ed Golder, 517-335-3014 Agency: Natural Resources

Oct. 22, 2012

The Department of Natural Resources asks hunters and other Michigan residents to continue to report sightings of dead deer to help with the department's efforts to monitor the outbreak of epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD) in the state this year.

Deer have died in substantial numbers in at least 29 counties this summer and fall due to EHD, and the DNR's Wildlife Division is recording reports of dead deer in these areas in order to answer questions from the public and prepare informed hunting season recommendations for 2013. The department will be taking reports of dead deer that are likely EHD-related until Jan. 1.

"Some people may have the perception that, once we have confirmed the presence of EHD in an area, we are no longer interested in additional reports of dead deer in those areas - that is not true. We want the reports," said Wildlife Division Chief Russ Mason. "Any and all reports, whether the deer seem to have died recently or not so recently, will help ensure we have accurate information about the extent of die-offs."

To report the presence of dead deer, the DNR encourages residents to contact their nearest Wildlife Office (information on Wildlife Offices is available at www.michigan.gov/wildlife, under Contact Information) or fill out the online Report Diseased Wildlife form.

For additional information about EHD and a regularly updated map showing the number of deaths from the disease by county, as well as a link to the report form, see www.michigan.gov/wildlifedisease (under Current Issues).

EHD is caused by a virus that is transmitted by a type of biting fly called a midge. A constant characteristic of the disease is its sudden onset. Deer can suffer extensive internal bleeding, lose their appetite and fear of humans, grow progressively weaker, salivate excessively and finally become unconscious. Due to a high fever, infected deer often are found sick or dead along or in bodies of water.

At present, just over 10,400 dead deer have been reported. The DNR expects more dead deer to be found as hunters take to the field.

"We want to thank the many volunteers and hunters who have helped - and continue to help - monitor the outbreak of this disease," Mason added.

Mason reminded hunters that the current deer season framework remains in place and will go as planned this year. When considering regulations for next year, the DNR will factor in the impact of EHD along with other influences on the deer population. In the meantime, Mason recommends that hunters and landowners assess the deer population in their area and carefully consider the amount of antlerless deer harvest they desire this year. People hunting in areas that were hit hardest by EHD may want to limit or curtail antlerless deer harvest.

EHD does not affect humans, so edibility of the venison is not affected by this disease. There is no evidence that humans can contract the EHD virus either from the midge or from handling and eating venison.

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is committed to the conservation, protection, management, use and enjoyment of the state's natural and cultural resources for current and future generations. For more information, go to www.michigan.gov/dnr.

 

Archery deer season now open statewide

Contact: Brent Rudolph, 517-641-4903; Ashley Autenrieth, 989-732-3541; or Ed Golder, 517-335-3014

Agency: Natural Resources

Oct. 2, 2012

The Department of Natural Resources reminds hunters that the archery deer season opened statewide on Monday, Oct. 1. The season runs through Nov. 14, then reopens after the firearm deer season for late archery hunting Dec. 1 through Jan. 1. Autumn is a great time to enjoy the outdoors in Michigan and bow hunting can be done when the weather is mild.

During the archery season, an archery license, combination license regular tag or combination license restricted tag can be used to harvest either an antlerless deer or a qualifying buck. Antlerless-only licenses are also valid during the archery season.

If a hunter chooses to harvest a buck with an archery tag or combination license, the following restrictions apply:

Using an archery tag: bucks must have one antler at least 3 inches long, except in DMUs 117, 135 and 245, where one antler must have at least two points, and in DMUs 045, 115 and 122, where one antler must have at least three points.

Using a combination license regular tag: bucks must have one antler at least 3 inches long, except in DMU 245, where one antler must have at least two points, and in DMUs 045, 115, 487 and the entire Upper Peninsula (U.P.), where one antler must have at least three points.

Using a combination license restricted tag: bucks must have at least four points on one side.

Hunters are limited to purchasing only two kill tags for bucks each year - either an archery tag and a regular firearm tag, or a combination license with two kill tags valid during both the archery and firearm hunting seasons. Regardless of the types of licenses purchased, if two bucks are harvested, one of them must have at least four points on at least one antler. Also, if a buck is harvested in the U.P. or DMU 487 with an archery tag, a second buck cannot be taken from that same hunting unit (U.P. or 487) with a regular firearm license. Hunters are encouraged to be familiar with the antler point restrictions in their chosen DMU before purchasing a license.

All archery and firearm seasons are open to crossbow hunting, except in the U.P., where deer hunters cannot use crossbows after Nov. 30 unless they have a disability permit. The free crossbow stamp is still required for all crossbow hunters.

Hunters are also reminded that the baiting of deer is prohibited in Alcona, Alpena, Montmorency and Oscoda counties, and within the townships of Oscoda, Plainfield, Wilber, Au Sable and Baldwin in Iosco County. Elsewhere, baiting may occur only from Oct. 1 to Jan 1. No more than 2 gallons of bait may be present at any hunting site at a time, and it must be spread out over a minimum 10-foot by 10-foot area. If hunters do choose to use bait, the DNR suggests they not place bait repeatedly at the same point on the ground, and only place bait out when they are actively hunting. This will minimize the chance of transmission of any disease that may be present, either deer-to-deer at bait sites or through contamination of bait.

In addition to bringing the opening of another Michigan deer season, this fall marks the 75th anniversary of the Pittman-Robertson Wildlife Restoration Act (PR), the program that directs funds from federal excise taxes on archery equipment, firearms and ammunition back to state wildlife agencies for wildlife conservation, restoration and hunter education.

"The department is extremely proud of the recreational and economic benefits of bow hunting, and of the important way in which more than 320,000 archers support wildlife management in Michigan," said DNR deer and elk program leader Brent Rudolph.

"The vast majority of all wildlife conservation efforts have been funded by hunters and trappers through the equipment and licenses that they buy," Rudolph said, "and the DNR, Michigan citizens and all who benefit from Michigan's natural resource-based economy are indebted for those contributions."

Detailed information about deer hunting regulations can be found in the Michigan Hunting and Trapping Digest, available at all license vendors, DNR Operations Service Centers and online at www.michigan.gov/hunting.

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is committed to the conservation, protection, management, use and enjoyment of the state's natural and cultural resources for current and future generations. For more information, go to www.michigan.gov/dnr.